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The Little Wretches: Press

I'm not a crying drunk. When I get loaded I look for the nearest bit of trouble and throw myself into the middle of it. Anything that ends up bringing out whatever human is left in me is something I can do without. That's why I hate the new disc by ex-Wretch Robert Wagner--it actually touches the dark pit in me where my soul resides. Worst of all, I can't stop playing it. "Scattered Seeds, Fruitless Trees and Grandma's Hat" presents ten songs that deal with life, loss, terminal illness, death loss, old age, and more loss. All without ever sounding morose. The stark instrumentation place the emphasis where it belongs--on the words. Here Wagner delivers as he serves up a narrative that varies from brutal ("Cancer Ward Blues") to touching ("Fall Upon the Rock"). His everyman voice is the perfect vehicle to deliver his tales that seem to keep coming back to the themes of looking back at what was, what never was and what could have been. His bare bones band is augmented by Rosa Colucci's harmonies and occasional violin, flute, and accordion which emphasizes the melancholy feel. This album tears me up and for some reason I keep coming back to it. "Scattered Seeds..." packs an emotional punch which only reminds me that life is just one big reason to continue drinking.
Oscar Flood - Dreaming Thru Life
WYEP's Mikel Ellcessor wants to thank The Little Wretches for "one of the best performances we've ever had on Modern Times, and I strongly encourage everyone in the world to see them.
Mikel Ellcessor - WYEP 91.3 Program Guide
The Wretches play music that is haunting and kinetic, featuring a healthy dose of Rimbaud, Vonnegut, Nelson Algren and "Grimm's really grim Fairy Tales" thrown in to keep audiences edgy and attentive.
Tony Norman - Post-Gazette
Bob Wagner is not the person you invite to sit down in your favorite comfortable chair. He'd probably burn a hole right through it when he sat down.
Fronting the Little Wretches...
John Young - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Beyond the Stormy Blast," The Little Wretches. Bamm! Bamm!

The title of the Little Wretches' new CD was taken from a tombstone epitaph declaring the departed "beyond the stormy blast." Call that irony, since the storms of life howl through most of the Wretches' songs.
As with the previous "Just Another Nail In My Coffin," the new CD's lyrics crackle with uncommon honesty, intelligence and toughness...
Tony Norman - Weekend Magazine
The CD (Just Another Nail In My Coffin), which will be unveiled tomorrow night at Studio Z Gallery, South Side, during an invitation-only party, is significant for two reasons. First, it may be the most powerful body of work to emerge from Pittsburgh since time began. Secondly, it gives people who don't do the South Hills an opportunity to finally meet the new Little Wretches on their own terms.
Ed Masley - Pittsburgh Press
Beyond the Stormy Blast, The Little Wretches (Bamm! Bamm! Records)

Anyone familiar with the Pittsburgh rock scene has heard of The Little Wretches: "Oh yeah, they're that band that sounds kinda like Dylan meets the Velvet Underground only sloppier. And they have an attitude problem--especially that Bob Wagner guy."
If the above sounds anything like your opinion of the Wretches, you're in for a shock. Western Pennsylvania's most misunderstood and underrated band has finally gotten focused. The resulting CD/cassette may be the best rock recording ever made in Pittsburgh...
...The high point is undoubtedly "Walking Among the Buildings," a sprawling nine minute masterpiece that sounds a little like Lou Reed and Paul Westerberg meeting in a car crash. Wagner's imagery has never been so vivid--or compelling.
Post-Gazette rating: A+
Steve Morrison - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Just Another Nail in My Coffin," the Little Wretches, Bamm! Bamm! Records.

It's been a while since a tune by a local band has hit me as strongly as the Little Wretches' version of Lou Reed's "I'll Be Your Mirror." The Wretches' Bob Wagner uses Reed's comforting lyrics about friendship as a kind of refrain. Around them, to the strains of acoustic guitar, piano and synthesized accordion, Wagner quietly recites a long, finely detailed poem that is disturbing, darkly humorous and sometimes profound.
Peter B. King - Pittsburgh Press